And if the community determines you as an outcast, justifying the dismissal of that member of society, are you still a person?

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https://youtu.be/r0T3gpfH_-w (YouTube video please watch)
Please read the stories and watch the video. We will be replying to a peer discussion that I will copy and paste below. I also added the files for you to look at it as to be MLA format and a minimum of 150 words. We will reply back to professor Donovan.
Donovan Hufnagle
Jun 26, 2022 at 9:21 AM
Class,
According to Nicolas Michaud anything “too different” than us is considered an “Other,” essentially, opposite of a person, which Michaud defines person as “someone that the rest of the community respects and acknowledges as one of their own” (155). If not a person, then these unaccepted others are just things, and “too different a thing for us to ever really accept…into our community” (155). Michaud offers more definitions and explanations about being a person in a community based on the philosophies of Kant and others, ultimately. My question, then, are people the monsters? As Jeffrey Cohen states, “This thing of darkness I acknowledge mine” (20). And if the community determines you as an outcast, justifying the dismissal of that member of society, are you still a person?
I have written about this very concept, concerning supernatural beings such as vampires. Using the epic poem Beowulf, which we may explore later on in the semester, and connecting the idea of humanity to each monster, Grendel, Grendel’s Mother, and the Dragon, I argue that the closer the beast is to being a person, the more they are a monster. Here is an excerpt from my article:
The immediacy of the monster to mankind and his commonality to “everything normal” brings evil ever so closer. Fear is more immediate and intense.
I’ll take the classic epic poem of Beowulf as an example to further illustrate my point. The three monsters in Beowulf are Grendel, Grendal’s mother, and the dragon. For this example, I will start with the last and move toward the first. The Dragon contains the least amount of evil: 1) it contains no human qualities, physically, mentally, or spiritually; 2) it remains removed from the town in a cave protecting treasure; and 3) it follows the code (in this case heroic and not moral) by protecting the treasure when the thief steals some of the treasure. The dragon does, ultimately, kill Beowulf; however, Beowulf breaks the heroic code by stepping over Wiglaf and fighting the dragon as king. The dragon, then, represents fate, and the hero’s fate is buried with his treasures.
Though Grendel’s mother is evil, her actions prove to be less than her son’s: 1) she contains little to no human qualities; 2) she remains removed from humanity in her cave (the underworld); 3) she follows the heroic code by avenging her son’s death. Grendel’s mother only leaves her cave and enters the mead hall to avenge her son’s death; and 4) Beowulf must go to the underworld to kill Grendal’s Mother. Unferth’s sword, created by man, fails in battle and Beowulf turns to a sword created for giants. Only a supernatural sword can kill Grendel’s mother.
By default, then, Grendel is the most evil and most feared: 1) ironically, Grendel contains the most human qualities. He is part human and part beast—beast-man. Some experts would even argue Grendel as a human, encompassing physical deformities; 2) though Grendel remains outside of the town, he ventures into town to kill the people. His immediacy to the town is far greater than any of the previous two; 3) Grendel does not follow the heroic code. He kills people because of the noise they create. Imagine killing your neighbors because they were too loud. He breaks the code by killing without adequate reason; 4) Grendel goes to the mead hall to battle Beowulf. Instead of Beowulf traveling to an underworld, Grendel comes to Beowulf, bringing him closer to humanity; and 5) though the giant’s sword kills his mother, Grendel’s blood melts the giant’s sword.

Full article HereLinks to an external site. (click link)
Dr. H
Works Cited
Cohen, Jeffrey Jerome. “Monster Culture (Seven Theses).” Monster Theory: Reading Culture, University of Minnesota Press, 1996, pp. 3-25.
Hufnagle, Donovan. “Being Human Has Never Been More Frightening.” Americanpopularculture.com, 2015.
Michaud, Nicolas. “I’m the Person, You’re the Monster.” Frankenstein and Philosophy: The Shocking Truth, Open Court, 2013.

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